Review: The Fall of the Readers (The Forbidden Library #4), by Django Wexler

The Fall of the ReadersWith Geryon trapped in the Infinite Prison, Alice has marshalled the other apprentices and the library creatures at his estate to fight back against the old Readers. Even with the aid of Ending to push back the Readers’ creatures who invade through the Library, they are hard pressed to hold their ground, and Alice knows it’s only a matter of time before attrition takes its toll. Together, she and Ending concoct a plan for Alice to seek the Great Binding that holds at bay a creature who could destroy the Labyrinthines, which the Readers use to keep them under their thumb. If Alice can take control of the Great Binding herself, she can free the Labyrinthines from the Readers’ influence and take away the source of their power. But if she isn’t powerful enough to hold the binding, she’ll die, dooming magical society to live under the Readers’ cruel ways — and in the quiet of her mind, the Dragon’s voice warns her that his sister cannot be blindly trusted…

When The Palace of Glass was the first book in the series to feel like it really had forward momentum, I worried that trying to wrap this story up in only four books was going to feel very rushed. I’m happy to say that Wexler pulled it off better than I expected, although The Palace of Glass remains the series’s peak.

Alice has been a weak point throughout, with her stunted emotional range, but in The Fall of the Readers (these passive titles are making me twitch) this is much improved. She wrestles with the leadership role she’s been thrust into and the fact that making battlefield decisions means taking charge of lives, some percentage of which, no matter how well you command, are going to be snuffed out. There are some revelations about Alice’s history that perhaps also make her earlier emotional detachment feel earned, and are cleverly foreshadowed, such that I was a little ashamed not to catch the twist until just before its reveal!

The secondary cast also remains delightful, but didn’t get quite as much opportunity to shine as in The Mad Apprentice and The Palace of Glass. I felt a little too much time was devoted to the fairly bland Isaac and the flourishing of the romantic connection that’s been hinted at throughout the series, which isn’t something I’m really interested in seeing with children this young, and I would rather have had a little more Dex or something instead. Ashes still gets to dominate the show with his wonderful prissiness and snark, though.

A complaint I levelled at the first couple of books was the lack of truly fantastical elements given the premise. This was something The Palace of Glass did a great job of addressing, with its fire sprites and haughty turtles and the general feeling that the Library was attached to whole worlds, not just set pieces. I guess the fourth book is a little bit of a step back in that regard, because it has to keep up quite a pace and there’s not as much time to make the weird and wonderful things it visits feel as alive as places like the fire sprite world, but it’s still a significant improvement on the first two, with moments such as dancing skeletons on alien landscapes and inventive fights against rock elementals.

In the end, Wexler did an impressive job of wrapping up all the loose ends. I really expected to be hankering after a fifth and maybe even a sixth book to feel like things had been properly wrapped up, but it turned out not to be needed, and I set The Fall of the Readers down content that all I need to see of Alice’s story has been told. I might wish he had taken a slightly different route getting there, one that allowed a deeper appreciation of all of the colourful places that the Library could take us, but I’m pretty content to be left without questions, just satisfaction. I think there might be room for other stories in this world, perhaps to see what kind of society the next generations ended up with, but I’d be equally okay with the author just leaving it here and going on to explore other things. The series as a whole was a fun, light read that recovered well from its early flaws, and I’m looking forward to checking out Wexler’s adult fantasy series.

4 stars

This entry was posted in Reviews and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.