Review: The Palace of Glass (The Forbidden Library #3), by Django Wexler

The Palace of GlassAlice and Ending have been working on a plan to exact vengeance against Geryon for the careless killing of Alice’s father. Under Ending’s tutelage, Alice has been learning to Write, to start to construct her own spells. It’s going to take a very long time for Alice to muster the kind of power she’ll need to confront a Reader of Geryon’s age and experience, though, and when Geryon leaves Alice alone in charge of the Library for a week, she and the labyrinthine see a narrow window of opportunity to get the upper hand. Alice must travel through two worlds to retrieve The Infinite Prison, a spell that ought to be strong enough to hold Geryon. But the Palace of Glass, where the Prison can be found, is a place said to drive mad all who visit it, and Alice must be there and back before the clock runs out…

Each book in this series has been better than the last. Once again, I feel like some of my complaints from the previous volume have been addressed and that The Palace of Glass is the most enjoyable of the books so far. In the previous novels, I’ve been bothered by the fact that for a series that talks a lot about the other worlds to be found in books, we don’t actually get to see them very much, and when we do they’re kind of lacking in vitality. But the lion’s share of The Palace of Glass is spent on Alice’s otherworldly adventure, and the worlds she visits are not just places to be fascinated by, but places worth caring about. I could read an entire spin-off about the fire-sprites and their home, their preservation of memory, their coping with the tributes and the fading of their world… Wexler does a wonderful job with the little evocative touches too, describing the sprites’ hair, voices, laughter, and deaths in ways that perfectly capture their nature as living flame.

The Palace of Glass also introduces some wonderful new allied characters. To date the only really interesting non-human ones have been the labyrinthines and their offspring, which is a bit of missed potential when you consider the possibilities of all the different kinds of beings that can exist in the worlds beyond the portal-books, but Alice’s companions in this book include an angry young fire-sprite who carries some of the oldest memories of his people, and a teenage ice giant who just wants to be an artist and exasperates her mother with her lack of fighting spirit. I took to them more than the gang of apprentices from The Mad Apprentice (except the delightful Dex, of course); with these additions, the series is growing quite a cast of characters I care about.

As far as characters go, Alice has been the weak link for me up until now, but while I wouldn’t go so far as to say that this entry in the series addresses my problems with her, it certainly minimises them. The story is structured in such a way that it doesn’t over-rely on her (lacking) emotional responses to things. The aspect of the story that is built on her personal growth is primarily about consequences. Alice has known from the start that the Readers’ power is based on subjugation and death, but here is where she really has to face up to what that means, and not just in the context of what Geryon has done but in how the Readers’ society and their magic is affecting all of the worlds they touch. It’s a narrative that kind of works with her weaknesses, because this is precisely the kind of situation that requires decisiveness without getting mired in depth of feeling. That said, it is sort of hilarious that there’s another death here, and ‘You’ll take care of the body, then? Righto, good’ seems to be the sum total of emotional reaction that Alice or anyone else can be bothered to conjure.

There have been funny moments throughout the last two books, but The Palace of Glass has some truly hilarious ones. I liked the helpful fire-sprite who couldn’t quite understand why setting humans on fire is not a healing experience, and the book definitely wins my prize for Best Fictional Turtles Ever. (No cash value. UK only. Expires 31 June 2016.)

At the time of writing, I’m seeing that this is going to be a four-book series. I’m a bit concerned that the series is almost over when it feels to me like it’s finally coming into its own, and the potentially rather epic setup we’re left with at the end seems like something that would need more than one book to satisfactorily resolve. Unless the fourth book is twice the size of this one, I fear the story is going to get short shrift. Nonetheless, I’ll be looking forward to it, and I hope it’s one of those tales that might grow in the writing — there’s a lot more here to be mined.

4 stars

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